24seven DH2

24seven DH2 Review

Twenty Four Seven have entered the Downhill Market with a very low price, but how have the faired? Read the full review here.

You won’t have been able to miss the fact that Twenty Four Seven released a downhill bike last year with a very interesting price tag.  Twenty Four Seven are well known for their range of affordable, yet strong and trusting steel hardtail frames, full bikes and components.  Now they have ventured into the downhill market, it’s a little more complicated than producing hardtails, so how have they done?

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When you look at the price of this bike as a full build you can see straight away that 24/7 have hit a gap in the market with the entire build that we have tested just a penny under one thousand pounds.  Now you’re not going to get a grade A downhill racing machine for this money, but it doesn’t mean your stuck with loads of no named plastic parts.  The frame itself is completely 4130 cromoly and it’s loaded up with a full Sram X7 system, Hayes HFX Nines discs, Manitou suspension and Maxis rubber.  Most of the other parts are accumulated from the 24/7 own brand products including their solid three piece cranks and 26” wheel build.

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24seven DH2

Unfortunately when you first sit on the bike one of the first things that you notice is how big the rise in the handle bars is.  The 24/7 dirt jump bars just don’t give the ride you want on a downhill bike.  Despite this problem the bike rides surprisingly well and the angles work nicely throughout the frame.  The Manitou Stance forks always stuck to the ground well and reacted nicely through all conditions, paired up with the Swinger 4way shock I couldn’t fault the suspension choice although it’s always nice to have a bit more adjustability which these don’t give.

Having a frame made completely from 4130 cromoly steel is great if you’re a bit of a frame destroyer, but it doesn’t make a bike to race on.  When riding the bike you really can feel its weight, especially at the rear of the frame.  However, an aluminium rear triangle is available to bring the weight down, which is a great option if you have the money.  The bike still feels quite nimble even with this weight, you just need to handle it a little more aggressively than you would with a lighter bike.  The Hayes brakes give you enough braking power and are easy to maintain whilst being mounted to 24/7’s 26” wheel set which stayed strong and true throughout the testing.  The rear wheel has a strong allen key bolt system holding it in place and the front has the trusty manitou 20mm axle which is strong and easy to use.

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One little annoying problem I found was the design of the cable routing on the frame just behind the bottom bracket.  The cables are split into separate outer sections around the frame and at this point when the suspension is fully compressed the cable pops out of its router.  Easily fixed though with a trusty cable tie or by running an outer the full length on the cable.  Another issue I found was the ability of the chain device, however I set it up it just didn’t seem to hold the chain over rough terrain.  There is a chain guide upgrade for an E13 device offered when purchasing the bike which I highly recommend.

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I did a lot of riding on this bike and overall found the quality was excellent when putting it along side the price of this full bike.  The chain device wasn’t up too much and the bars where too big but apart from that if your looking for your first downhill rig on a budget and don’t mind a the weight then this bike is for you.  The Twenty Four Seven DH2 is a great bike and it’s fantastic to see that downhill bikes are becoming more affordable to riders.

Since this test Twenty Four Seven have released the DH3, its more expensive but they look to have ironed out the problems found on the DH2.  For more information visit the website or your local dealer.

www.24sevenbikes.com